If by the April 17th deadline, you can file

If you find yourself in the situation of not being able to finish your 2017 tax return by the April 17th deadline, you can file for an extension! Getting an extension will give you an additional six months to file your taxes.
Call The Tax Defense Group today! We offer free filing extensions, but you have to call before April 17th. (888) 373-9385.

Tax extensions will become available on April 17th, and it only takes a few minutes for us to complete your extension request.

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If your request is accepted, you can use this extra time to ensure that all of your information on your forms is correct. For instance, if you lost your W-2 form (that your employer gave you) and you are waiting for a copy, you’ll have the ability to get it in the mail and make any necessary alterations before sending it back.

A tax extension will give you until October 15th, 2018 to file without the IRS leveeing failure-to-file penalties. Although an extension allows you six extra months to file, it doesn’t mean that you get an extra six months to pay any fees.

You can request an extension by paying all or a portion of your estimated taxes due, and by indicating that your payment is for an extension using: Direct Pay, the Electronic Federal Tax Payment System (EFTPS), or a credit or debit card. This way you won’t have to file a second form.

If I file for an extension, when do I have to pay the money I owe?An extension only moves the deadline for your federal tax forms to be filed not your tax payment due date. Filing an extension does not affect the deadline for your state tax return. You must still pay any estimated tax liability owed by April 17th, 2018, or you will be subject to interest and penalties.

Whether you owe money to the IRS or you have a State tax debt, our staff of Enrolled Agents and Tax Attorneys can help. We have over 50 years of experience in negotiating with the IRS in all 50 States. States, in general, are much more difficult and more aggressive in their collection actions than the IRS is.